Trading places orange juice trade explained

And since orange juice spoils, they MUST find someone that promises to buy it, or the loss is complete. The frenzy to sell causes the price to plummet even faster. Winthorpe and Valentine only need to wait a bit, and then they reverse course, now promising to buy orange juice from others, at a lower price. So the price starts falling. When the price hits 29 cents a pound, Winthorpe and Valentine start agreeing to buy orange juice in April. In other words, Winthorpe and Valentine have contracts allowing them to buy millions of pounds of orange juice in April for 29 cents a pound, and to sell it for $1.42 a pound. They sold high and bought low. Basically, Winthorpe and Valentine are SELLING frozen concentrated orange juice futures en masse, with the knowledge that the crop report will show no hard freeze, implying bountiful oranges, which will cause the price to collapse.

21 Aug 2019 The (quite funny) Eddie Murphy/Dan Akroyd movie "Trading Places" came to its thrilling climax over the price of frozen orange juice, a product that most of us Investors trade contracts to speculate on prices in the market. 22 Oct 2009 The Dukes had invested their fortune in orange juice futures based on But now, Goldman Sachs (NYSE:GS) has been taking a page out of the Trading Places That exemption will be very narrowly defined to include only  23 Sep 2014 In the movie "Trading Places," starring Eddie Murphy, the Duke brothers intended to profit from trades in frozen concentrated orange juice futures contracts using an illicitly obtained The Wall Street Journal explained it thus: They are investors who trade in 'agricultural derivatives' based on 'futures' – or  29 Aug 2001 I was a floor trader for ten years and the only positive role model I ever had He's the definition of joyful cool as he delicately picks among a group of hyped I understood that they knew the price of orange juice was going to  Here's their floor broker, Wilson, set to pull off what he thinks is a foolproof moneymaking trade. He's been instructed to buy Frozen Concentrated Orange Juice futures non-stop until the crop

Trading Places, a 1983 comedy film directed by John Landis, stars Dan Aykroyd, Eddie The Dukes use orange juice as an example when they begin teaching Valentine about Double-Meaning Title: It's about two people who trade places.

Aykroyd and Murphy steal a report that will cause the price of orange juice to fall, and replace it with a report that says OJ prices will rise. They do this because they know their enemies, the Duke brothers, will trade on the phony report. Moving to the big scene, the Duke brothers, through their trader, In Trading Places, millionaires Randolph and Mortimer Duke can't agree on the whole nature versus nurture theory. So they decide to bet $1 on it and determine the winner by installing homeless con And since orange juice spoils, they MUST find someone that promises to buy it, or the loss is complete. The frenzy to sell causes the price to plummet even faster. Winthorpe and Valentine only need to wait a bit, and then they reverse course, now promising to buy orange juice from others, at a lower price. So the price starts falling. When the price hits 29 cents a pound, Winthorpe and Valentine start agreeing to buy orange juice in April. In other words, Winthorpe and Valentine have contracts allowing them to buy millions of pounds of orange juice in April for 29 cents a pound, and to sell it for $1.42 a pound. They sold high and bought low. Basically, Winthorpe and Valentine are SELLING frozen concentrated orange juice futures en masse, with the knowledge that the crop report will show no hard freeze, implying bountiful oranges, which will cause the price to collapse. The story about the Dukes' cornering of the orange juice market was probably inspired by the "Silver Thursday" market crash of March 27, 1980, when the Hunt brothers of Texas tried to corner the silver market and subsequently failed to meet a one hundred million dollar margin call.

So the price starts falling. When the price hits 29 cents a pound, Winthorpe and Valentine start agreeing to buy orange juice in April. In other words, Winthorpe and Valentine have contracts allowing them to buy millions of pounds of orange juice in April for 29 cents a pound,

10 Aug 2018 The 1983 comedy starring Eddie Murphy and Dan Ackroyd is good reminder of why investors should always keep a level head, says Matthew  4 Jan 2017 So obviously as it's been Christmas Trading Places has been on the TV a lot. And obviously, even though I know the script off by heart, I still  The Duke trader, on the other hand, is in a panic because his bosses and I believe that concentrated orange juice is traded in Chicago, not  6 Jan 2020 See more ideas about Trading places, From rags to riches and Eddie Here's What Happened In The Complex Commodity Trade At The End Of 'Trading Places' real-life climax in cinematic history: the Trading Places orange juice Trading Places Frozen Concentrated Orange Juice Trade Explained .

Trading Places, a 1983 comedy film directed by John Landis, stars Dan Aykroyd, Eddie The Dukes use orange juice as an example when they begin teaching Valentine about Double-Meaning Title: It's about two people who trade places.

26 Dec 2006 "With the authentic orange crop report indicating a good harvest of fresh oranges, frozen concentrated orange juice (FCOJ) would be less  25 Dec 2015 Trading Places isn't exactly a traditional Christmas film. But I thought that the Dukes' explanation of what the commodities markets goods like gold, or wheat, or, in this case, orange juice—was fun to watch and easy to understand. That's why they end up at the NYMEX pit at the World Trade Center. 12 Jul 2013 The Duke brothers have told their trader to buy orange juice futures, and to keep buying no matter how high the price goes. The market opens  Trading Places, a 1983 comedy film directed by John Landis, stars Dan Aykroyd, Eddie The Dukes use orange juice as an example when they begin teaching Valentine about Double-Meaning Title: It's about two people who trade places. Eddie Murphy, Jamie Lee Curtis & Dan Ackroyd - "Trading Places" (1983 Trading Places Frozen Concentrated Orange Juice Trade Explained Trading  Trading Places Script taken from a transcript of the screenplay and/or the Eddie We're about to make millions of dollars in frozen orange juice and you're talking about human nature. We are here to try to explain to you, what it is we do here. The Dukes' trader is going to be buying like crazy right from the opening. 10 Aug 2018 The 1983 comedy starring Eddie Murphy and Dan Ackroyd is good reminder of why investors should always keep a level head, says Matthew 

1 Jul 2013 We wanted to zero in on what is arguably the most arcane, real-life climax in cinematic history: the Trading Places orange juice futures scam.

In Trading Places, millionaires Randolph and Mortimer Duke can't agree on the whole nature versus nurture theory. So they decide to bet $1 on it and determine the winner by installing homeless con And since orange juice spoils, they MUST find someone that promises to buy it, or the loss is complete. The frenzy to sell causes the price to plummet even faster. Winthorpe and Valentine only need to wait a bit, and then they reverse course, now promising to buy orange juice from others, at a lower price.

Trading Places is a 1983 American comedy film directed by John Landis and starring Dan their holdings to buying frozen concentrated orange juice futures contracts; other traders follow their lead, inflating the price. Valentine and Winthorpe gleefully explain to the Dukes that they had made a wager on whether they